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BHS Swimming Class

Balboa Pool Address:
51 Havelock St

San Francisco, CA 94112                                                                                                                              Phone:(415) 337-4701

Instructor: Val Cubales

What to wear when swimming?

Male Students should wear swimsuits that offer coverage, but won't drag and cause discomfort in the water. You may also need a swimming cap if you have longer hair or prefer to not get your hair wet.

For Female Students, a swimming class is not the place to wear a skimpy bikini, which could slide and become uncomfortable. Wear a moderate-coverage ONE piece suit instead. You'll likely also need a swimming cap to keep hair under wraps and limit its exposure to chlorine, which can become problematic if you're in the pool often.

Dress Guidelines

We hold high expectations for student performance at Balboa High School.  In order for students to participate safely and effectively during class activities, they need to be dressed in appropriate clothes.  Proper attire at Balboa High School includes:

  • Balboa High School logo blue shorts (or navy blue athletic shorts with no markings)
  • Balboa High School logo T-shirt (or gray t-shirt with no markings)
  • Tennis shoes that are laced and tied properly and white socks
  • Balboa High School logo sweats/sweatshirts (or navy or grey sweats with no markings)
  • Jewelry must be removed prior to class starting

 

 

Portfolio Guidelines

The following is what you need and how you should organize your portfolio.

Materials needed:

  1. 3 Prong FOLDER (preferably plastic) with 2 pockets
  2. 4 Dividers with tabs (4 for physical education

Expectations:

  • All of your work must be TYPED.
  • All of the materials received in your Freshman and Sophomore Physical Education classes should be included in your portfolio.
    • Hole punch all of the handouts you receive and insert them into the 3 prong part of your portfolio.
    • Smaller items should be put into a sheet protector.
  • Keep the materials within the portfolio organized and neat.

Title Page:

When we open your portfolio, the first thing we should see is your title page.   Your title page should catch our eye so be creative and spice it up with pictures, drawings, etc.  The title page should include your name, registry, grade/semester/year, and the name of your instructor.  Put your title page into a sheet protector.

Example:

 

My Portfolio

Gianmarco  Juarez

Reg. 0210

                            9th/Fall 2014               9th/Spring 2015               10th/Fall 2015       10th/Spring 2016

Instructor:    Mr. Cristiano Ronaldo              

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grade Sheet:

We will give you a grading sheet for your portfolio.  This should be in a sheet protector.  It will go behind your title page.  

Syllabus:

Put the syllabus you receive from your teacher into a sheet protector.  This should go behind your grade sheet.

4 Dividers should be labeled as follows:

  1. Autobiography – Write the story of your life.  Include information about when and where you were born.  Describe your immediate family (pets included); the schools you have attended; your favorite courses; your hobbies, outside interests, and special talents you have or awards you have received.  Write of your plans for the future. 
    • Include a current picture of yourself.
    • Put your autobiography into a sheet protector.
  1. Physical Fitness Data – When you have taken the pre-test for the physical fitness tests (PFT’s), your teacher will give you a letter that includes your PFT scores to have your parents read and sign.  The portion of the letter with your data will be included in this section of your portfolio.  You will also receive a Physical Fitness data card which should also be included in this section. The card can be put into a sheet protector.
  2. Study Guides / Notes– The study guides you receive from your teachers should be put into this section.  Any notes that are taken in class must also be included in this section.
  3. Classroom Work / Tests / Quizzes / Projects – Notes taken from the text, study questions, and vocabulary words will be put into this section.  Graded tests, quizzes and/or projects will be included in this section.

 

 

 

 

Physical Education and Health

MISSION STATEMENT

All Balboa High School students will become literate in 21st century physical education, life-long fitness and wellness. They will develop positive social skills, learn to self-assess, learn to set personal goals and become informed consumers. Our ultimate goal is for students to embrace healthy lifestyles and become joyful learners through physical activity.

SFUSD Physcial Education Course 1

Grade: 9

PEPE151                                                              

Prerequisite: For 9th grade students or other students taking their first high school physical education course.

For 9th grade students or other students taking their first high school physical education course.  It is further designed for students to: develop skills, gain knowledge and apply movement patterns in :  Title V required 8  component areas (4 areas in Course 1 and 4 areas in Course 2): Team Sports, Tumbling & Gymnastics, Self-Defense, Mechanics of Movement and participate in on-going health and skill-related fitness activities.  Theories, rules and regulations, techniques, strategies and tactics, positive social skills and safety are taught and emphasized during all of the activities. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of and competency in a variety of motor skills, achieve a health-related level of physical fitness, demonstrate knowledge of fitness concepts, and learn the value of positive psychological and sociological strategies that apply to the needs of individuals in a diverse society. Ninth-grade students learn to use biomechanics to analyze and improve performance, such as leverage, force, inertia, rotary motion, opposition, and buoyancy. Students work on the skill-related fitness components to enhance their performance. The skill-related fitness components are speed, power, agility, coordination, reaction time, and balance. Students use their understanding of training and conditioning practices to improve skill acquisition and performance. Understanding the three areas (biomechanics, skill-related fitness, and training and conditioning), along with the role of emotions, provides learners with the comprehensive knowledge for improving performance in aquatics, rhythms/dance, and individual and dual activities.   On their path to becoming independent learners of movement skills, students improve their understanding of motor learning concepts. By the end of ninth grade, students can create practice plans for improving their own performance in aquatics, rhythms/dance, and individual and dual activities. These practice plans are based on each student’s strengths and weaknesses as identified through feedback from proprioception, from others, and from the performance of complex movement activities.2 Students continue to participate in enjoyable and challenging activities at a moderate to vigorous level for a minimum of four days each week. The activities address the five components of health-related fitness. To expand on the variety of activities in which they participate, students identify available fitness resources in the community. Throughout the year students are assessed through scientifically based health-related physical fitness assessments to determine whether they meet health-related fitness performance standards. Students set goals based on the outcome of those assessments and develop and implement monthly personal physical fitness plans. By the end of Course 1, students meet the minimum health standards on a scientifically based health-related physical fitness assessment.

Looking toward the future, students learn to transfer their knowledge of fitness to real-world situations. They identify the physical fitness requirements of future occupation choices.  They also analyze consumer physical fitness products and programs for use in their future fitness plans. Finally, now that students are older and more mature, they learn the inherent risks associated with physical activity in extreme environments. Students set goals and then describe the positive feelings they experience from successful participation in physical activity.  By the end of Course 1, students discuss the changing psychological and sociological needs of a diverse society in relation to physical activity. They understand that physical activity is universal, and all cultures around the world perform physical activities. Through participation in activities from different parts of the world, students gain greater insights into the history and traditions of different cultures. Students extend this learning to social interaction and cooperation at home as well as in their future workplace. Students learn that each group member brings different strengths and abilities and that it is important for the group to identify and utilize the strengths of each member to be successful in physical activities. They understand that success can be achieved only when students cooperate and interact positively with other.  Students will be empowered to make wise choices, meet challenges, and develop positive behaviors in fitness, wellness, and movement activity for a lifetime.  Supplementary texts that will be used throughout the course include Physical Best and Fitness For Life.

 

Standard 1
Students demonstrate knowledge of and competency in motor skills, movement patterns, and strategies needed to perform a variety of physical activities.

  1. 1.1  Combine and apply movement patterns, simple to complex, in aquatic, rhythms/dance, and individual and dual activities.
  2. 1.2  Demonstrate proficient movement skills in aquatic, rhythms/dance, and individual and dual activities.
  3. 1.3  Identify, explain, and apply the skill-related components of balance, reaction time, agility, coordination, explosive power, and speed that enhance performance levels in aquatic, rhythms/dance, and individual and dual activities.
  4. 1.4  Explain and demonstrate advanced offensive, defensive, and transition strategies in aquatic and individual and dual activities.
  5. 1.5  Explain the use of the principles of biomechanics (leverage, force, inertia, rotary motion, opposition, and buoyancy); apply the principles to achieve advanced performance in aquatic, rhythms/dance, and individual and dual activities; and evaluate the performance based on the use of the principles.
  6. 1.6  Examine the physical, emotional, cognitive, and scientific factors that affect performance and explain the relationship between those factors.
  7. 1.7  Analyze and evaluate feedback from proprioception, from others, and from the performance of complex motor (movement) activities to improve performance in aquatic, rhythms/dance, and individual activities, and dual activities.
  8. 1.8  Analyze and explain which training and conditioning practices have the greatest impact on skill acquisition and performance in aquatic, rhythms/ dance, and individual and dual activities.
  9. 1.9  Create or modify practice/training plans based on evaluative feedback of skill acquisition and performance in aquatic, rhythms/dance, and individual and dual activities.
  10. 1.10  Analyze situations and determine appropriate strategies for improved performance in aquatic, rhythms/dance, and individual and dual activities.
  11. 1.11  Assess the effect/outcome of a particular performance strategy in aquatic, rhythms/dance, and individual and dual activities.
  12. 1.12  Demonstrate independent learning of movement skills.

Standard 2
Students achieve a level of physical fitness for health and performance while demonstrating knowledge of fitness concepts, principles, and strategies.

  1. 2.1  Participate in moderate to vigorous physical activity at least four days each week.
  2. 2.2  Participate in enjoyable and challenging physical activities that develop and maintain the five components of physical fitness.
  3. 2.3  Meet health-related physical fitness standards established by a scientifically based health-related fitness assessment.
  4. 2.4  Use physical fitness test results to set and adjust goals to improve fitness.
  5. 2.5  Improve and maintain physical fitness by adjusting physical activity levels according to the principles of exercise.
  6. 2.6  Identify the physical fitness requirements of an occupation.
  7. 2.7  Develop and implement a one-month personal physical fitness plan.
  8. 2.8  Analyze consumer physical fitness products and programs.
  9. 2.9  Explain the inherent risks associated with physical activity in extreme environments.
  10. 2.10  Identify and list available fitness resources in the community.
  11. 2.11  Explain the role of physical activity in the prevention of disease and the reduction of health care costs.

Standard 3
Students demonstrate knowledge of psychological and sociological concepts, principles, and strategies that apply to the learning and performance of physical activity.

Self-Responsibility

  1. 3.1  Accept personal responsibility to create and maintain a physically and emotionally safe and nonthreatening environment for physical activity.
  2. 3.2  Act independently of negative peer pressure during physical activity.
  3. 3.3  Identify and evaluate personal psychological response to physical activity.
  4. 3.4  Describe the enjoyment, self-expression, challenge, and social benefits experienced by achieving one’s best in physical activities.
  5. 3.5  Develop personal goals to improve one’s performance in physical activities.

Social Interaction

  1. 3.6  Discuss the changing psychological and sociological needs of a diverse society in relation to physical activity.
  2. 3.7  Analyze the role that physical activity plays in social interaction and cooperative opportunities in the family and the workplace.
  3. 3.8  Recognize the value of physical activity in understanding multiculturalism.

Group Dynamics

  1. 3.9  Recognize and evaluate the role of cooperation and positive interactions with others when participating in physical activity.
  2. 3.10  Identify and utilize the potential strengths of each individual in physical activity.

 

 

 

 

SFUSD Physcial Education Course 2

Grade: 10-12             

Prerequisite: PE 1

PEPE152                                                                   

This course is designed to be taken after Course 1 to complete the Title V required 8 component areas: Team Sports/Activities, Tumbling/Gymnastics, and Self-Defense, Mechanics of Body Movement. It is further designed for students to; develop skills, gain knowledge and apply movement patterns and participate in on-going health and skill related fitness activities.  Instruction on the effects of dynamic health and the mechanics of body movement are integrated throughout the year. Theories, rules and regulations, techniques, strategies and tactics, positive social skills and safety are taught and emphasized during all of the activities. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of and competency in a variety of motor skills, achieve an optimal level of health-related physical fitness, demonstrate knowledge of fitness concepts, and learn the value of positive psychological and sociological strategies that apply to the needs of individuals in a diverse society.  By the end of Course 2, students demonstrate proficiency in activities.  A personal defense class in which students learn how to avoid dangerous situations as well as how to defend themselves meets the self-defense requirement. Proficiency gives the student the capacity for success leading to advanced levels of performance that increase the likelihood of continued participation well into adulthood. Students can combine movement patterns to perform advanced offensive, defensive, and transition strategies in team sport situations. Once performed, students can evaluate the effectiveness of the strategy. Students can also combine movement patterns to create more complex gymnastics/tumbling routines and combative combinations. Tenth-grade students learn to use biomechanics to analyze and improve performance, such as leverage, force, inertia, rotary motion, and opposition. Students also explain and use the skill-related fitness components to enhance their performance. The skill-related fitness components are speed, power, agility, coordination, reaction time, and balance. Students can also use their understanding of training and conditioning practices to improve skill acquisition and performance. Understanding these four areas (biomechanics, motor learning, skill-related fitness, and training and conditioning), along with the role of emotions, provides learners with the comprehensive knowledge for improving performance in self-defense, gymnastics/tumbling, and team sport activities.  On their path to becoming independent learners of movement skills, students increase their understanding of motor learning concepts. By the end of tenth grade, students create practice plans for improving their own performance in self-defense, gymnastics/tumbling, and team sport activities. These practice plans are based on their personal strengths and weaknesses as identified by the students through feedback from proprioception, from others, and from the performance of complex movement activities.3 For some students, Course 2 may be the last opportunity to learn about physical fitness and achieve levels of excellence in physical fitness beyond the performance standards established by scientifically based health-related fitness assessments. Students should be assessed on each of the health-related fitness components throughout the school year, so that physical activity can be adjusted to accommodate changes in age, growth and development, and goals. Students continue to develop an exercise habit by participating in challenging activities at a moderate to vigorous level for a minimum of four days each week based on individual needs and interests.  During Course 2, students learn to be wise consumers by evaluating fitness products and programs, as well as fitness resources in the community. They also learn the facts about ergogenic aids that claim to enhance body composition, appearance, physical fitness, and performance. By the end of Course 2, students can develop and describe a physical fitness plan that enhances personal health and performance. Their plans also take into consideration future leisure and workplace activities. Besides planning their own fitness programs, students can also develop and implement appropriate personal physical fitness programs for family or community members.  In Course 2, students learn to identify and participate in those activities that they enjoy. They learn that their choice of physical activities may change throughout their lives. They understand that physical activities may need to be modified to allow participation by individuals of various ages and those with special needs. Students realize they will need to evaluate and refine their personal goals continually to improve performance in physical activities. Through their participation in regular physical activity, students learn the psychological benefits of physical activity. They can explain the role of attitude, motivation, and determination in achieving personal satisfaction from challenging physical activities.  As their social skills mature, tenth-grade students identify the effects of individual differences on preference for and participation in physical activity. These differences may include age, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and culture. As to age and special needs, students learn how to select and modify physical activities so that everyone can participate.  In terms of group dynamics, students learn to identify leadership skills. They learn to perform planned leadership assignments and also assume spontaneous leadership roles. By the end of Course 2, students know how to encourage others to be supportive and inclusive of individuals at all ability levels. Students will be empowered to make wise choices, meet challenges, and develop positive behaviors in fitness, wellness, and movement activity for a lifetime.  Supplementary texts that will be used throughout the course include Physical Best and Fitness For Life.

Standard 1
Students demonstrate knowledge of and competency in motor skills, movement patterns, and strategies needed to perform a variety of physical activities.

  1. 1.1  Combine and apply movement patterns, from simple to complex, in combative, gymnastic/tumbling, and team activities.
  2. 1.2  Demonstrate proficient movement skills in combative, gymnastic/ tumbling, and team activities.
  3. 1.3  Explain the skill-related components of balance, reaction time, agility, coordination, explosive power, and speed that enhance performance levels in combative, gymnastic/tumbling, and team activities and apply those components in performance.
  4. 1.4  Explain and demonstrate advanced offensive, defensive, and transition strategies and tactics in combative, gymnastic/tumbling, and team activities.
  5. 1.5  Explain the use of the principles of biomechanics (leverage, force, inertia, rotary motion, and opposition); apply the principles to achieve advanced performance in combative, gymnastic/tumbling, and team activities; and evaluate the performance based on use of the principles.
  6. 1.6  Evaluate the relationships of physical, emotional, and cognitive factors affecting individual and team performance.
  7. 1.7  Analyze and evaluate feedback from proprioception, from others, and from the performance of complex motor (movement) activities to improve performance in combative, gymnastic/tumbling, and team activities.
  8. 1.8  Analyze and explain which training and conditioning practices have the greatest impact on skill acquisition and performance in combative, gymnastic/tumbling, and team activities.
  9. 1.9  Create or modify practice/training plans based on evaluative feedback from skill acquisition and performance in combative, gymnastic/ tumbling, and team activities.
  10. 1.10  Analyze situations to determine appropriate strategies to use in comba­tive, gymnastic/tumbling, and team activities.
  11. 1.11  Assess the effect/outcome of a particular performance strategy used in combative, gymnastic/tumbling, and team activities.
  12. 1.12  Evaluate independent learning of movement skills.

Standard 2                                                                                                                                                Students achieve a level of physical fitness for health and performance while demonstrating knowledge of fitness concepts, principles, and strategies.

  1. 2.1  Participate in moderate to vigorous physical activity at least four days each week.
  2. 2.2  Participate in challenging physical fitness activities using the principles of exercise to meet individual needs and interests.
  3. 2.3  Identify and achieve levels of excellence in physical fitness that enhance physical and mental performance beyond the standards established by scientifically based health-related fitness assessments.
  4. 2.4  Assess levels of physical fitness and adjust physical activity to accommo­date changes in age, growth, and development.
  5. 2.5  Justify the use of particular physical activities to achieve desired fitness goals.
  6. 2.6  Develop and describe a physical fitness plan that enhances personal health and performance in future leisure and workplace activities.
  7. 2.7  Develop and implement an appropriate personal physical fitness program for a family or community member.
  8. 2.8  Explain how to evaluate consumer physical fitness products and programs.
  9. 2.9  Identify and evaluate ergogenic aids that claim to enhance body composition, appearance, physical fitness, and performance.
  10. 2.10  Evaluate the availability and quality of fitness resources in the community.
  11. 2.11  Use and analyze scientifically based data and protocols to assess oneself on the five components of health-related physical fitness.

Standard 3
Students demonstrate knowledge of psychological and sociological concepts, principles, and strategies that apply to the learning and performance of physical activity.

Self-Responsibility

  1. 3.1  Participate in physical activities for personal enjoyment.
  2. 3.2  Examine and explain the ways in which personal characteristics, performance styles, and preferences for activities may change over a lifetime.
  3. 3.3  Evaluate the psychological benefits derived from regular participation in physical activity.
  4. 3.4  Explain and analyze the role of individual attitude, motivation, and determination in achieving personal satisfaction from challenging physical activities.
  5. 3.5  Evaluate and refine personal goals to improve performance in physical activities.

Social Interaction

  1. 3.6  Identify the effects of individual differences, such as age, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and culture, on preferences for and participation in physical activity.
  2. 3.7  Explain how to select and modify physical activities to allow for partici­pation by younger children, the elderly, and individuals with special needs.

Group Dynamics

  1. 3.8  Identify leadership skills, perform planned leadership assignments, and assume spontaneous leadership roles.
  2. 3.9  Encourage others to be supportive and inclusive of individuals of all ability levels.

 

 

 

 

 

 

BSKT150                                                                                                                   Basketball

Grades:10-12            Prerequisites: PE 2

This course is designed to give students the opportunity to learn and develop the fundamental and advanced skills, team tactics, rules and strategies of basketball.  Students will learn and develop basic individual skills such as: ball handling, dribbling, shooting, passing and defending, and team tactics such as; man to man/zone defenses, a variety of offenses and rules, regulations and terminologies associated with basketball.  Theories, rules and regulations, techniques, strategies and tactics, positive social skills and safety are taught and emphasized during this course.  Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge and competency in all basketball related skills. Students will be empowered to make wise choices, meet challenges, and develop positive behaviors in team activities, aerobic fitness, wellness, and movement activity for a lifetime.  

Standard 1

Movement  Skills

Standard 2

Fitness Skills

Standard 3

Psychological and Social Skills

Students demonstrate knowledge of and competency in motor skills, movement patterns, and strategies needed to perform a variety of physical activities.

1.1 Demonstrate advanced knowledge and skills in two or more aerobic activities, selecting one or more from each of the following categories:

Category 1 Category 2

Aerobic dance

Basketball

Cross-country skiing

Running Cycling

Skating Rowing

Swimming Triathlon

Walking

1.2 Identify the characteristics and critical elements of a highly skilled performance in aerobic activities and demonstrate them.

1.3 Apply previously learned movement concepts to the learning and development of the motor skills required for successful participation in aerobic activities.

1.4 Identify and apply the principles of biomechanics necessary for the safe and successful performance of aerobic activities.

1.5 List the safety equipment required for participation in aerobic activities; describe and demonstrate the use of such equipment.

1.6 Demonstrate independent learning of movement skills in aerobic activities.

Students achieve a level of physical fitness for health and performance while demonstrating knowledge of fitness concepts, principles, and strategies.

2.1 Identify and achieve a personal level of excellence in physical fitness.

2.2 Engage independently in physical activity that increases aerobic capacity.

2.3 Evaluate goal-setting and other strategies as effective tools for maintaining and increasing adherence to a personal physical activity program.

2.4 Measure health-related physical fitness periodically and adjust physical activity to achieve fitness goals.

2.5 Identify and explain the positive effects of participation in aerobic activity on personal health.

 

Students demonstrate knowledge of psychological and sociological concepts, principles, and strategies that apply to the learning and performance of physical activity.

Self-Responsibility

3.1 Engage independently in aerobic activities.

3.2 Develop personal goals to improve performance in aerobic activities.

3.3 Compare and contrast the effective leadership skills used in aerobic activities and those used in other physical activities.

3.4 Identify and analyze aerobic activities that enhance both personal enjoyment and the challenge.

3.5 Evaluate the risks and safety factors that may affect participation in aerobic activities throughout a lifetime.

Social Interaction

3.6 Invite others to join in aerobic activity.

3.7 Explain how to select and modify aerobic activities to allow for participation by younger children, the elderly, and individuals with special needs.

3.8 Analyze the role of social interaction in the successful participation in and enjoyment of aerobic activities.

 

Group Dynamics

3.9 Accept and perform planned and spontaneous leadership assignments and roles in aerobic activities.

3.10 Analyze the role that cooperation and leadership play in aerobic activities.

3.11 Engage in aerobic activities both in school and outside school.

SWIM150                                                                                                       Swimming

Grades: 10-12            Prerequisites: PE 2

This course is designed to develop and practice basic to advanced swimming skills.  Students will be instructed in proper stroke techniques including; the crawl stroke, backstroke, breaststroke and butterfly stroke.  Upon completion of this course students will be able to demonstrate basic fundamental skills and stroke techniques associated with swimming. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge and competency in water safety and survival skills, as well as learn the value of positive psychological and sociological strategies that apply to the needs of individuals in a diverse society.    SFUSD recommends passing a swim proficiency test. The swim proficiency test requires students to; swim 6 widths of the pool in prone position (any stroke including front crawl

or breaststroke) and tread water for 1 minute.  Students will be empowered to make wise choices, meet challenges, and develop positive behaviors in fitness, wellness, and movement activity for a lifetime.

Standard 1

Movement  Skills

Standard 2

Fitness Skills

Standard 3

Psychological and Social Skills

Students demonstrate knowledge of and competency in motor skills, movement patterns, and strategies needed to perform a variety of physical activities.

1.1 Demonstrate advanced knowledge and skills in two or more aquatic activities, selecting one or more from each of the following categories:

Category 1 Category 2

Diving Life guarding

Kayaking/Canoeing/Rowing Scuba diving

Snorkeling Synchronized swimming

Swimming Water polo

1.2 Identify the characteristics and critical elements of a highly skilled performance in aquatic activities and demonstrate them.

1.3 Apply previously learned movement concepts to the learning and development of motor skills required for successful participation in aquatic activities.

1.4 Identify and apply the principles of biomechanics necessary for the safe and successful performance of aquatic activities.

1.5 List the safety equipment required for participation in aquatic activities; describe and demonstrate the use of such equipment.

1.6 Demonstrate independent learning of movement skills in aquatic activities.

1.7 Identify and practice the safety skills necessary for entering swimming pools, lakes, rivers, and oceans (e.g., walking, jumping, falling, and diving).

1.8 Demonstrate and explain basic water rescue with and without equipment.

1.9 Demonstrate and explain basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Students achieve a level of physical fitness for health and performance while demonstrating knowledge of fitness concepts, principles, and strategies.

2.1 Meet physical fitness standards that exceed those of a scientifically based health-related fitness assessment.      

2.2 Participate in aquatic activities that improve or maintain health-related physical fitness.

2.3 Analyze the effects of participation in aquatic activities on levels of health-related physical fitness activities and a personal fitness program.

2.4 Improve or maintain one’s physical fitness by adjusting physical activity levels according to the principles of exercise.

2.5 Explain the relationship between participation in aquatic activities and indicators of good health.

2.6 Demonstrate the ability to develop criteria and analyze factors to consider in the purchase of products and programs related to aquatic activities.

2.7 Develop and implement a month-long personal physical fitness plan that includes aquatic activities.

2.8 Explain how aquatic activities contribute to the development and maintenance of health-re­lated physical fitness.

2.9 Create and implement aquatic programs that improve health-related physical fitness.

Students demonstrate knowledge of psychological and sociological concepts, principles, and strategies that apply to the learning and performance of physical activity.

Self-Responsibility

3.1 Compare and contrast the effective leadership skills used in aquatic activities and those used in other physical activities.

3.2 Develop personal goals to improve performance in aquatic activities.

3.3 Identify and analyze aquatic activities that enhance personal enjoyment.

3.4 Evaluate the risks and safety factors that may affect participation in aquatic activities throughout a lifetime.

3.5 Identify and demonstrate personal responsibilities for safety and hygiene in the aquatics setting.

Social Interaction

3.6 Explain how to select and modify aquatic activities to allow for participation by younger children, the elderly, and individuals with special needs.

3.7 Analyze the role of social interaction in the successful participation in and enjoyment of aquatic activities.

Group Dynamics

3.8 Accept and perform planned and spontaneous leadership assignments and roles in aquatic activities.

3.9 Analyze the role that cooperation and leadership play in aquatic activities.

3.10 Engage in aquatic activities both in school and outside school.

 

 

P.E Staff
Contact Val C. Cubales  Val C. Cubales Teacher
Contact Jacqueline R Glassman  Jacqueline R Glassman Teacher
Contact Lawrence C. Gray Jr.  Lawrence C. Gray Jr. Teacher
Contact Erin Hall  Erin Hall Health Teacher
Contact Rocio Ramirez  Rocio Ramirez Teacher

PE ON SALE

You can buy your PE Uniform before school and during lunch.

Please bring your forms ready for purchase.

Medical Excuses for Physical Education

Generally, a student well enough to be in school is required to dress in the appropriate physical education dress code.  When a situation arises that would make activity harmful for a student, the following procedure is to be followed: the student is to bring an excuse signed by a parent, guardian, or physician to the teacher before class begins.  A physician's note is needed after 3 days of consecutive days of Physical Education Class with a signed note from the parent.  In all cases, a student is still required to dress in the PE dress code.

Physical Fitness Testing

We will begin administering the State Mandated Physical Fitness Test starting in February 2015.  All Freshman will take the following tests: 1 mile run,curl ups, push ups, flexibility, trunk lift and body mass index. Sophomores who have not passed the PFT's will ONLY retake the tests that have not passed.